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Gaming Review: Astro Gaming A10 vs Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

Side by side look at how the A10 compare to the Void Elite.
Side by side look at how the A10 compare to the Void Elite.

At half the price of the competition, it comes as a surprise that a budget-friendly gaming headset can dominate in almost all categories.

We bought the Astro Gaming A10 & Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless for the purpose of this review comparison.

The Astro Gaming A10 is an impressive budget-friendly headset from Astro that comes in at half of the price of the Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless. The price and the fact the Void Elite are wireless, are the two most significant differences between the gaming headsets.

It will be tough for the A10s to compete with the Void Elite’s wireless functionality, however, that isn’t the most important aspect for a pair of gaming headphones. Functionality may be a plus, but it won’t win the day if the Void Elite have lackluster sound quality, mic quality, and comfort, and all for double the price tag.

I reckon it will be a tough fight for the Void Elite, as the A10 show time and time again they can deliver in the most important areas for a very low price tag. However, with all the factors taken into consideration, it’s time to find out which pair of headphones are better overall!

Want to know how we rated each of these headsets? Check out the individual reviews for the Astro Gaming A10 & Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless.

Technical Specifications

Technical SpecificationAstro Gaming A10Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless
FormOver-ear wiredOver-ear, wireless
Drivers40mm Neodymium magnet dynamic drivers50mm high-density neodymium audio driver
Impedance32 Ohms32 Ohms @ 1kHz
Sensitivity104 dB116DBb (±3dB)
Frequency Response20 Hz - 20 kHz20Hz - 30kHz
Removable CableYesYes
Connector3.5mm plugUSB Type A
MicYesYes
Wireless rangeN/A40 foot range of wireless connection
Weight346g390g
CompatibilityPC, MAC, PS4/PS5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X & S, Nintendo Switch, Mobile devicesPC, PS4/PS5, Xbox One

Packaging and Accessories

The A10 and Void Elite boxes are a prime example of how appearances can be misleading. Both boxes look professional, however, there is a very apparent lack of effort within the packaging.

Both headsets have professional-looking boxes.
Both headsets have professional-looking boxes.

Astro Gaming A10

In the box:

  • A10 gaming headset
  • A10 volume cable
  • 3.5mm female to dual 3.5mm TRS splitter cable
A look at how the A10 are packaged inside the box with the included cords.
A look at how the A10 are packaged inside the box with the included cords.

Behind their professional cover, the A10 don’t have much to offer. The headphones are snug in the plastic packaging and the cords are in a plastic bag bundled together. They meet the minimum requirements but overall are underwhelming and unboxing them isn’t an exciting experience.

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

In the box:

  • Corsair RGB Elite wireless headphones
  • Wireless USB Bluetooth connector
  • Micro USB charging cable
  • Microphone foam windscreen
First look at how the Void Elite are roughly placed on the cardboard with no other protection.
First look at how the Void Elite are roughly placed on the cardboard with no other protection.

The Void Elite have a stylish box with thick protective cardboard. It’s a great first impression, that I immediately lose upon opening the box.

The headphones are jammed tight against the cardboard interior which is rough on the padding. I have to fight with the headphones just to get them out of the box and feel like I may break them.

I want headphones packaging to get me excited to wear them. A little effort goes a long way in establishing a positive first impression, and both the A10 and the Void Elite lack in that department.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Packaging and Accessories Verdict

It’s reassuring that both headphones come with high quality accessories. The Void Elite have a charging cable, USB Bluetooth connector, and foam windscreen, and the A10 have a removable cable and 3.5mm splitter for headphone and mic ports on PC. While all are of good quality, neither package is especially generous.

Overall, I find myself unsatisfied with both headphones’ packaging. They may present themselves in a stylish manner, however, it’s very evident both packages are thrown together.

At least the thick plastic mold of the A10 is smooth and the headset is easy to take out, compared to the rough and tight cardboard packaging of the Void Elite. I can’t say the A10 have much better packaging, as they only give me minimal satisfaction, but that is more than I get from the Void Elite.

Design and Functionality

Astro Gaming A10

I’m not a fan of the A10’s boxy ear cups and odd choice of colors. The grey, orange, and black are just flat-out dull, which is indicative of their low price point.

Unless you get an Astro MixAmp, which needs to be purchased separately, the A10 again, only cover the bare minimum in functionality. The mic is flip to mute and there’s an in-line volume dial on the cord. And that’s it.

In-line volume dial on the A10 removable cord.
In-line volume dial on the A10 removable cord.

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

The Void Elite don’t follow conventional headset design. The look is definitely original, but just comes across as awkward, and this worries me about their comfort. They aren’t done any justice with the simple black and white color palette, and it’s hard to advertise them as “RGB” when only the Corsair logo on the ear cups sports it.

I’ll give credit where credit is due, namely for the Void Elite’s functionality. The outside of the left ear cup has the power on button and also the mic mute button. Additionally, the mic is automatically muted when flipped up.

Left ear cup of the Void Elite that holds all the functionality features.
Left ear cup of the Void Elite that holds all the functionality features.

On the left cup are the volume dial and charging port to enable the headset’s wireless functionality. All the functionality features are conveniently and neatly placed, making them hardly noticeable.

Tie: [Astro Gaming A10] & [Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless]

Design and Functionality Verdict

Clean design of the A10 compared to the unconventional design of the Void Elite.
Clean design of the A10 compared to the unconventional design of the Void Elite.

This is a tough argument, which really comes down to preference. The A10 have an average design and minimal functionality. On the other hand, the headband, aluminum yoke, and ear cups on the Void Elite aren’t streamlined, giving them an awkward and inconsistent look.

However, the Void Elite have unquestionably superior functionality. This places both headphones in the middle when both design and functionality are considered.

If you’re willing to chance the Void Elite design for the added functionality, go for it, but if functionality isn’t a big priority, best play it safe with the A10 headset.

Comfort

Astro Gaming A10

The A10s do a lot of things right with their comfort. First, the headband never gives me aches and is comfortable to wear for long periods of time. I don’t like the boxy ear cups but I give them credit for having soft padding and solid airflow.

The A10 is barely noticeable on my head and gives me a great comfort experience.
The A10 is barely noticeable on my head and gives me a great comfort experience.
The A10s aren’t lacking in comfort and are among the best I’ve tested

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

The headset doesn’t cause me any aches and are extremely light, which in this case is a problem. The Void Elite never feels snug on my head and the ear cups don’t make a complete seal around my ears. You can argue for that reason they are highly breathable, but really is just a design flaw.

I’ll give props for Corsair’s attempt at an original design, but sadly, it just doesn’t work.
The Void Elite sit awkwardly on my head and don't give a firm fit.
The Void Elite sit awkwardly on my head and don’t give a firm fit.

They constantly shuffle on my head and don’t make a good mold. One quick head movement and they easily slide out of position.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Comfort Verdict

The Void Elite’s unique design ultimately costs them. They aren’t snug, move out of place, and just sit awkwardly on your head in general. It’s not even a battle, the A10s clearly best the Void Elite in comfort.

Build Quality

Astro Gaming A10

The A10s have me worried about their build quality because I only see plastic on the headset. The headband doesn’t adjust smoothly and the removable cable needs to be forcefully plugged in and removed.

The A10 are entirely constructed of plastic.
The A10 are entirely constructed of plastic.

The headband is durable and shows good restraint to being bent but I can’t say the same about the  ear cups and where they connect to the headband. The slightest resistance worries me that the plastic will snap at any moment.

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

My first impression of the Void Elite is that they are cheaply built. Again, all I can see is a whole lot of plastic, which feels even less reliable than the A10.

Besides the aluminum yoke that connects the ear cups to the headband, which is surprisingly strong, the surrounding plastic on the Void Elite is constructed of the poorest plastic material of any of the headsets I have tested.

Photo of the only durable material on the Void Elite, the aluminum yolks.
Photo of the only durable material on the Void Elite, the aluminum yokes.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Build Quality Verdict

Side by side look at the plastic material used on both headphones.
Side by side look at the plastic material used on both headphones.

I can’t give either headphone credit for their build quality. Neither give me the impression they are built with quality materials and both worry me that they will break easily.

With that being said, I have more faith in the A10. The plastic is more durable in comparison, and the headband shows good resistance. It’s not much, but it’s enough to beat out the Void Elite.

Mic Quality

Astro Gaming A10

I tested the A10 while playing Call of Duty on PS4 with friends. I don’t run into any audio issues with the mic and my friends relayed that I sound clear. However, there is an issue with blocking out background noise.

The mic is great at picking up sound, so great, it picks up background audio far too easily. My voice is audibly clear, but so is the background sound, and that results in a constant muffle.

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

I received poor feedback from my teammates when I swapped over to the Void Elite in the same session. My voice was clear but noticeably quieter than the A10. I had to constantly re-say call-outs and with loud moments my comms are barely noticeable.

Keep in mind, that the mic is positioned right next to my mouth, and I am speaking as if I’m talking to someone right next to me.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Mic Quality Verdict

The mics are very similar in design.
The mics are very similar in design.

Both headphones provide clear sound and have issues blocking out background noise. But, the Void Elite’s monotone voice transmission is annoying and I much prefer the loud and clear delivery the A10 mic offers.

Connectivity

Astro Gaming A10

The A10 connectivity list is short and simple. There is a 2m long cable, terminated in a 3.5mm plug. This makes the headset compatible with all devices with a 3.5mm socket. Additionally, there is a splitter cable for separate mic and audio ports for PC.

The A10 headset's 2m long cable and Y splitter.
The A10 headset’s 2m long cable and Y splitter.
If you want to further expand the A10 connectivity, you will need to buy an Astro MixAmp, at an additional cost.

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

Being a wireless headset, the Void Elite have a lot more to offer. The headphones connect to PC, PS, and Xbox consoles through a USB Bluetooth connector. They also support up to a 16hr battery life, with 40ft of wireless range, and can be used while charging.

Close up look at the Void Elite USB Bluetooth connector and charging cable.
Close up look at the Void Elite USB Bluetooth connector and charging cable.
Additionally, the Void Elite are compatible with the iCUE software that allows you to switch between audio presets like FPS Competition and Bass Boost.

Winner: [Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless]

Connectivity Verdict

The A10s cover the bare minimum for connectivity. With that being said, they are compatible with more devices than the Void Elite, which can’t be used on Switch or with mobile platforms. I do most of my gaming on PC and console and prefer the Void Elite’s ease of no wires and the freedom to move about.

Sound Quality

Comparing sound quality on PC

Astro Gaming A10

Testing the A10s on Apex Legends gives me a really good impression for their sound quality. The soundstage is clear in pinpointing audio and what direction it’s coming from. With that, the mids and highs are distinguishably clear and I never have a tough time deciphering them, nor do the lows drown anything out.

Testing out the A10 headset while playing the new Apex Legends season 13.
Testing out the A10 headset while playing the new Apex Legends season 13.

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

Transitioning to the Void Elite with Apex Legends, gives me a very different impression. They are noticeably quieter and I can’t rely on the 7.1 surround sound. Sounds are hard to distinguish and increasing the volume just makes the audio jumble even worse.

Testing out the Void Elite while playing the new Apex Legends season 13.
Testing out the Void Elite while playing the new Apex Legends season 13.

Swapping between audio presets with the iCUE software makes little difference, if any at all. The “FPS Competition” preset gives me the slightest improvement in audio clarity. The most noticeable preset is the “Bass Boost” which I don’t need to use since the soundstage already isn’t clear.

Comparing sound quality on console

Astro Gaming A10

Swapping to Call of Duty on console, the A10 show no compromises. The directional audio is clear with its cues and the audio is immersive and highly detailed. Performance between platforms is consistent.

Testing out the A10 headset while playing the new Call of Duty Operation Monarch.
Testing out the A10 headset while playing the new Call of Duty Operation Monarch.

Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless

Sadly, the same can be said for the Void Elite, as the audio performance is equally disappointing on PC or console. I have a hard time understanding audio cues, even with the audio maxed out. The low audio output of the Void Elite results in me having a hard time making sense of what I’m hearing.

Testing out the Void Elite while fighting King Kong in the new Call of Duty Operation Monarch.
Testing out the Void Elite while fighting King Kong in the new Call of Duty Operation Monarch.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Sound Quality Verdict

Thick and plush padding of both headsets ear cups.
Thick and plush padding of both headsets ear cups.

The A10s are the clear winner for sound quality on both PC and console. I’m unsure why the Void Elite have such a low volume output but it’s the same issue as the mic quality. Even without fancy 7.1 surround DSP, the A10 have effective directional sound and really give a professional gaming audio experience.

Overall Winner

Overall Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Winner of each section

  • Packaging and Accessories: Astro Gaming A10
  • Design and Functionality: Tie: Astro Gaming A10 & Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless
  • Comfort: Astro Gaming A10
  • Build Quality: Astro Gaming A10
  • Mic Quality: Astro Gaming A10
  • Connectivity: Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless
  • Sound Quality: Astro Gaming A10

Key SimilaritiesKey Differences
 

  • Both headphones have a flip to mute mic and volume dial.

  • Both headphones are mainly built with plastic materials.

  • Both headphones use dynamic drivers.


 

  • The Void Elite are wireless, while the A10 are wired.

  • The A10 have far better sound quality, mic quality, and comfort.

  • The Void Elite have 7.1 surround sound on PC but not console.

  • The A10 do not have 7.1 surround sound on PC or console.

  • The A10 are compatible with all devices that have a 3.5mm socket, while the Void Elite are only compatible with PC and consoles.

  • Void Elite have an RGB LED logo on the ear cups, while the A10 have no lighting.

  • The Void Elite design is unconventional, while the A10 design is plain.


 

 

Difference between each headsets ear cups design and aesthetic.
Difference between each headsets ear cups design and aesthetic.

Conclusion

It’s a rarity to see a headset almost be completely swept by a competing pair. Especially when it is half the price! But that’s exactly what the A10 does when compared to the Void Elite.

The A10's streamlined and Void Elite's not so streamlined appearance.
The A10’s streamlined and Void Elite’s not-so-streamlined appearance.

The Void Elite are only able to tie the A10 in design because of their greater functionality, and to beat out the A10 in connectivity for their wireless capabilities, but that’s it.

The A10 deliver in the most important areas of sound quality, mic quality, and comfort. Beyond that, they also take the cake for build quality and packaging. It’s an obvious choice for me, the A10 are far better than the Void Elite.

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