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Gaming Review: Astro Gaming A10 vs Sennheiser GSP 302

First look at the A10 bulky design compared to the GSP 302 streamlined design.
First look at the A10 bulky design compared to the GSP 302 streamlined design.

A renowned headphone company’s gaming headset falls short of the standard set by a dedicated gaming brand.

We bought the Astro Gaming A10 and Sennheiser GSP 302 for the purpose of this review comparison.

When looking for a new pair of gaming headphones, most people go for trusted gaming brands first. Not many consider other notable brands, like Sennheiser, who have a great reputation in the audio industry but aren’t solely dedicated to gaming. As a result, they often get excluded when talking about gaming headphones.

It’s time to evaluate if a gaming headset from a non-gaming company, with such a renowned reputation, can rival one from a well-known gaming brand. That’s exactly what we’re looking to find out by comparing the Astro Gaming A10 and the Sennheiser GSP 302.

The A10 continues to show their value as a gaming headset. Despite a low cost, they are successful in the most crucial areas. Can the GSP 302 compete in the same departments?

Want to know what we rated each of these headsets? Check the individual reviews for the Astro Gaming A10 and the Sennheiser GSP 302

Technical Specifications

Technical SpecificationAstro Gaming A10Sennheiser GSP 302
FormClosed-back, Over-ear, wiredClosed-back, Over-ear, wired
Drivers40mm Neodymium magnet dynamic driversDynamic drivers (size not listed)
Impedance32 Ohms19 Ohms
Sensitivity104 dB113 dB
Frequency Response20 Hz - 20 kHz15 Hz - 26 kHz
Removable CableYesNo
Connector3.5mm plug2 x 3.5 mm / 1 x 3.5 mm (PCV 05 adapter)
MicYesYes
Weight346gNot listed
CompatibilityPC, MAC, PS4/PS5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X & S, Nintendo Switch, Mobile devicesPC, Mac, PS4/PS5, Xbox 360/ Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, Mobile devices

Packaging and Accessories

The packaging for both headphones are essentially identical. Both are made of plastic and don’t have a lot of extra attachments. It will be interesting to see who does it better.

The boxes!
The boxes!

Astro Gaming A10

In the box:

  • A10 gaming headset
  • A10 volume cable
  • 3.5mm female to dual 3.5mm TRS splitter cable
The A10 only include a Y splitter cable and removable cord for accessories.
The A10 only include a Y splitter cable and removable cord for accessories.

At such an affordable price, I don’t expect much more than what I get with the A10 packaging and accessories. The headset simply rests in a plastic mold, and the removable cable and adapter make up the additional accessories.

Sennheiser GSP 302

In the box:

  • Sennheiser GSP 302 headset
  • PCV O5 combo audio adaptor
  • Safety guide
The GSP 302 include a PCV O5 Combo audio adaptor.
The GSP 302 include a PCV O5 Combo audio adaptor.

The GSP 302 are packaged in a plastic mold, nearly identical to the A10. The only included accessory is the PCV O5 combo audio adaptor. The GSP 302 cost more, and with that, I expect better packaging and additional accessories.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Packaging and Accessories Verdict

The A10 and GSP 302 have almost identical packaging and accessories. Both headphones come in a plastic mold and only offer an audio splitter as an additional accessory. Neither one feels better than the other, and it is almost like I get Deja Vu comparing them.

Despite both headphones covering the bare minimum, I have to give the win to the A10 because they’re cheaper.

If I’m paying a higher price for a headset, I expect it to have better presentation and accessories.

Design and Functionality

Astro Gaming A10

The A10 don’t follow the conventional streamline design of most gaming headphones. Instead, they appear boxy due to the squared-off ear cups. It’s not my favorite look, and the orange and grey color combo don’t do it for me.

Design aside, the A10 comes in different color palettes so that you can find one more to your liking.
In-line volume dial on the A10 removable cable.
In-line volume dial on the A10 removable cable.

The A10 functionality consists of a flip-to-mute mic and volume dial on the removable cable, and that’s it. To expand the A10 functionality, you need an Astro MixAmp, available at an additional cost.

Sennheiser GSP 302

The GSP 302 are very streamlined. The ear cups are oval and look like they’ll be a good fit for my ears. On top of that, they flow seamlessly with the headband.

With that said, the GSP 302 could use a dash of color. The all-black color scheme doesn’t exactly scream “style,” but the good news is they come in a couple of other color options of black/white and white/blue, but they seem hard to find for the 302.

Overly large volume dial on the FSP 302 right ear cup.
Overly large volume dial on the FSP 302 right ear cup.

The functionality for the GSP 302 consists of a flip-to-mute mic and a volume dial on the right ear cup. It’s unnecessarily large, and I prefer a smaller, more straightforward dial on the cord.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Design and Functionality Verdict

Side look at the GSP 302 streamlined appearance compared to the A10 boxy design.
Side look at the GSP 302 streamlined appearance compared to the A10 boxy design.

The A10 take the edge mainly for their functionality. Although both headphones have a flip-to-mute mic and volume dial, I prefer the volume dial on the A10. Plus, there’s an argument to be made about the A10 removable cable, which the GSP 302 do not have.

I do prefer the GSP 302 design over the A10. However, I much prefer style over design. And at least the A10 has some style with their color pattern, rather than merely all black, like the GSP 302.

Comfort

Astro Gaming A10

The A10 boxy design doesn’t appear comfortable, but it is. I don’t get an ache from the headband with long sessions. In fact, I barely notice it. The squared-off ear cups don’t squish my ears and give me plenty of room, and their cloth padding has good airflow.

Despite their bulky design, the A10 cause me zero aches.
Despite their bulky design, the A10 cause me zero aches.

Sennheiser GSP 302

The GSP 302 is the first headset I’ve reviewed that have leatherette on the ear cups and cloth on the headband. Not many companies seem to cross over the two, but they should because it provides a great comfort experience.

Split in the GSP 302 headband to even out stress.
Split in the GSP 302 headband to even out stress.

Another innovative feature is the split headband. This prevents the stress from falling on one point and disperses it across both bands. As a result, I experience no discomfort with the headset, even after long hours of gaming.

Tie: [Astro Gaming A10 & Sennheiser GSP 302]

Comfort Verdict

I can confidently say that both the A10 and GSP 302 are among the top comfort quality I’ve had from a gaming headset.

Despite wildly different designs, both headphones succeed in comfort. Their ear cups are plush and soft, and neither headband cause me discomfort.

The smallest distinction I can see is that the GSP 302 have slightly worse airflow because it is made of leatherette rather than cloth, but it is not a significant difference. Regardless, I have to give both headphones a tie because they really succeed in comfort.

Build Quality

Astro Gaming A10

The low price of the A10 reflects their build quality. The headset is all plastic, and while likely durable, I don’t feel confident in their longevity. Particularly where the headband connects to the ear cups. Adjusting the headband is not fluid because it’s all made of plastic.

The headband doesn't adjust fluidly on the A10 headset.
The headband doesn’t adjust fluidly on the A10 headset.

The outside of the ear cups feels like the most durable part. The plastic is firm and does not bend. The headband shows decent resistance. However, I don’t feel comfortable testing its limits.

Sennheiser GSP 302

The GSP 302 is also primarily made of plastic. I’m not usually charmed by plastic headphones, but the GSP 302 prove that I can rely on them.

A strong plastic joint connects the ear cup and headband.
A strong plastic joint connects the ear cup and headband.

The headband shows an outstanding balance between flexibility and sturdiness, especially where the headband connects to the ear cups. The plastic joint appears delicate, but after applying more force than I care to confess, it holds up.

Winner: [Sennheiser GSP 302]

Build Quality Verdict

Showcase of the majority plastic both headphones display.
Showcase of the majority plastic both headphones display.

Both headphones have a plastic construction, but the GSP 302 presentation is significantly more impressive. The headband easily surpasses the A10 in terms of flexibility, adjustment, and resistance.

I am also much more confident in the joint connecting the ear cups and the headband. The only part the A10 seems to put up a comparable fight is the quality of the outside of the ear cups.

Mic Quality

Astro Gaming A10

The A10 mic makes it simple for me to talk and make call-outs with my teammates. I never run into feedback, and my teammates find background noise as the only issue.

The mic seems to have a tough time blocking background sound, and it can create a wind-tunnel effect. You can hear what I’m talking about in the recordings below.

Sennheiser GSP 302

I hate to say it, but the GSP 302 mic is barely functional. Even in a quiet environment with no sound, background static comes through. Whenever I turn on my microphone, my teammates say they can hear both my voice and the static.

Sadly, this only gets worst with background noise. It’s barely usable, and I am quite let down. I even receive comments about poor mic quality while squading with randoms.

Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Mic Quality Verdict

Side by side look at the similar microphones.
Side by side look at the similar microphones.

In general, the majority of gaming headsets and headphones have a difficult time blocking out background sound. At least the A10 show they are trying to combat it, as my voice still gets through.

I can’t say that about the GSP 302. Not only do they perform terribly with blocking background noise, but even in a quiet environment, they are muffled to the point where they are barely usable.

Connectivity

Astro Gaming A10

There isn’t much to discuss with the A10 connectivity. They have a 3.5mm audio connector that makes them compatible with almost all devices, and an additional Y splitter is included for separate mic and audio ports on PC.

Close up look at the Y splitter and removable cable for the A10 headset.
Close up look at the Y splitter and removable cable for the A10 headset.

Sennheiser GSP 302

The same goes for the GSP 302. However, the roles are reversed. The wired cord is a 3.5mm audio cable that splits into two ports, one for mic and audio. To make it compatible with other devices, you simply attach the PCV O5 audio adapter, which combines the plugs into a single 3.5mm TRRS plug.

Close up look at the GSP 302s PCV O5 combo audio adaptor.
Close up look at the GSP 302s PCV O5 combo audio adaptor.

Tie: [Astro Gaming A10 & Sennheiser GSP 302]

Connectivity Verdict

Both headphones offer the same in terms of functionality, with a connective cord and the option to split it into the separate mic and audio ports. The only difference is the A10 cord is removable. However, since the cord needs to be plugged in to be used, there really isn’t a difference between the headphones’ connectivity.

Sound Quality

Comparing sound quality on PC

Astro Gaming A10

Playing Vampire The Masquerade: Bloodhunt shows me that the A10 meets Astro’s reputable status for gaming peripherals. Directional sounds, like footsteps, are accurate and distinct. It’s not always precise, but nine times out of ten I can rely on it. The mids and highs are distinct enough for me to distinguish the sound they are making.

I can hear the cue of the AI signalling an enemy is nearby, even across on another rooftop.
I can hear the cue of the AI signalling an enemy is nearby, even across on another rooftop.

Sennheiser GSP 302

It’s quickly apparent that the GSP 302 lows, mids, and highs aren’t as sharp as the A10. All sounds come in at an even level, so the mids constantly take over the highs, and the lows tend to take over both.

Although this player was right next to me, I couldn't hear his footsteps because of gunfire in the background.
Although this player was right next to me, I couldn’t hear his footsteps because of gunfire in the background.

With this being the case, relying on the GSP 302 for directional cues is difficult. It’s not always made clear what sound I’m hearing, and I find myself guessing sounds from time to time.

Comparing sound quality on Console

Astro Gaming A10

Testing the A10 on Fortnite shows me they have the equivalent sound quality on PC and console. The directional sound is clear and rarely has me questioning what I’m hearing. The only time I do is with sounds far in the distance.

The A10 directional audio is pin point in telling me there is a player at my flank.
The A10 directional audio is pin point in telling me there is a player at my flank.

Sennheiser GSP 302

The GSP 302 also shows me a similar performance on PC. The lows, mids, and highs aren’t distinguishable. Altogether, they provide an immersive sound, but when it comes to FPS gaming, I need better separate audio cues.

GSP 302 lead me to shots in the distance, although I am unsure where they are exactly. I have to get a closer look.
GSP 302 lead me to shots in the distance, although I am unsure where they are exactly. I have to get a closer look.

If I am playing a story or adventure game, the GSP 302 sound is highly immersive and enjoyable. However, it’s a different story with a FPS.

[Astro Gaming A10]

Sound Quality Verdict

Side by side comparison of the outside and inside of each ear cup design.
Side by side comparison of the outside and inside of each ear cup design.

As an FPS gamer, you need a clear and distinct sound presentation to have your back. The lows, mids, and highs must all stand out and be precise with their sound. Clarity is the case for the A10 but not the GSP 302.

The GSP 302 sound is good and immersive, but they are not meant for playing FPS games as I can’t rely on the directional audio.

Overall Winner

Overall Winner: [Astro Gaming A10]

Winner of each section

  • Packaging and Accessories: Astro Gaming A10
  • Design and Functionality: Astro Gaming A10
  • Comfort: Tie: Astro Gaming A10 & Sennheiser GSP 302
  • Build Quality: Sennheiser GSP 302
  • Mic Quality: Astro Gaming A10
  • Connectivity: Tie: Astro Gaming A10 & Sennheiser GSP 302
  • Sound Quality: Astro Gaming A10
Key SimilaritiesKey Differences
Both headphones have similar packaging.
Both headphones offer the same accessories.
Both headphones are equal in comfort.
Both headphones are made of plastic.
Both headphones have a flip-to-mute mic.
Both headphones have a volume dial.
Both are compatible with the same devices.
The A10 have a squarish design while the GSP 302 are streamlined.
The A10 have a removable cable
The A10 mic is far better than the GSP 302.
The A10 sound quality is worthy for FPS gaming, while the GSP 302 is lacking.

Conclusion

To answer the question I posed at the start of this article, the Sennheiser GSP 302 can’t compete with the Astro Gaming A10 headset. This may be a surprise since Sennheiser is such a reputable headphone brand, but they aren’t dedicated to gaming, and it shows.

A final look at how they match up side by side.
A final look at how they match up side by side.

Astro, a dedicated gaming headphone company, knows how gaming audio differs from regular music listening. Gaming headsets need reliable sound cues and balanced and distinguishable mids and highs. The GSP 302 simply do not provide these elements. Not to mention, the GSP 302 have a barely usable microphone.

The GSP 302 are a solidly built headset that is comfortable and durable. However, they fall short in the crucial aspects of sound, microphone quality, and price. The affordable Astro Gaming A10 claim another victory!

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